FREE Weekly Planner Printables

Blog, Planners

It’s the beginning of a new school year, and we’re all gearing up for another crazy season. Are you ready?

If not, keep reading.

I was reasonably well organized at my last job with the help of my Bullet Journal, but when I switched jobs this summer, I just couldn’t keep up with all the projects and deadlines and timelines. It was too much to track, and too much work to make so many pages so quickly.

Sure, I could buy a planner for a couple bucks from the store. But none of them fit me. None of them had everything I wanted.

So, as any reasonable girl would do, I went to Pinterest.

There were millions of options, as Pinterest tends to provide, but I began curating content that fit my style, and stumbled across the Traveler’s Notebooks, or the Midori system.

I’d looked at this system before; it looks so cute put together!… But I didn’t want to invest a ton of money on building a system I may or may not like or use.

I’d rather not spend any money, to be honest.

So I created my own version of a Traveler’s Notebook, in a desktop size: plain old 8.5×11 inch paper!

No cutting, no waste, no new expenses.

Everybody has plain old printer paper on hand. It costs practically nothing, and it’s a good size.

I made a cover out of some extra leather we had in our stock, and I used elastic string to run a few bands up and down the spine.

Print, fold, insert, go.

That’s my kind of timeline.

And I think this could work for you, too.

Because I love this system so much, I’m going to let you try out my printables for free! No mailing list, no email, no strings attached!

Download and print your very first journal insert here.

Here’s what you need to know about it:

  • Use letter-sized paper (8.5″x11″).
  • Print it double-sided (and have it flip on the short edge!)
  • Most printers are able to handle 0.25″ margins, so there should be no need to “fit” or “scale” this page. It’s made to print in its original, actual size.
  • Fold the booklet in half, and you’re ready to go for the next 2 weeks! If you want more weeks, simply print multiple copies and nest them inside each other.
  • Share this website with your friends if they want a copy, too! All I ask is that you link back to this original website.

After developing my first printable, I’ve made over 60 pages of printable resources to fit my needs. I’m looking forward to sharing them with you over the next few weeks.

I hope they help you as much as they’ve helped me. Because we’re all crazy busy, and we need to stick together.

I’m rooting for you!

Sacred Heart & Immaculate Heart coloring page

Art, Blog, Coloring Pages

I’ve always wanted to design my own coloring book, so this is a step in the right direction: a good learning curve.

As Pope Saint John Paul II said:

“Artistic talent is a gift from God and whoever discovers it in himself has a certain obligation: to know that he cannot waste this talent, but must develop it.”

That’s been my goal with these creative ventures: to develop these talents God gave me.

Click to download this free sheet: Download the Sacred Heart Immaculate Heart PDF

Sacred Heart Immaculate Heart

The Litany of Humility

Blog, Reflections

During Lent this year, I’m focusing on spending my time more intentionally: what is most important in my life.

I downloaded the Hallow app and am participating in the #Pray40 challenge: spending 15 minutes of intentional prayer every day.

Today’s reflection was on the Litany of Humility, which goes like this:

The Litany of Humility (1)The Litany of Humility (2)

It “hurts so good,” as the saying goes. It’s a painful set of things to pray for: no one wants to be forgotten or rejected. No one wants to be marginalized or persecuted.

But Jesus was. And we will be, too.

We know, in our hearts, that this is the kind of life God is calling us toward: a life of putting others first. It’s a beautiful reminder, no matter how uncomfortable we feel while reading it.

Note that I’m not advocating for any kind of self-depreciation: the world will depreciate us enough as it is. This prayer is calling us to accept our suffering as it comes to us, and to lighten the load of others when we can.

Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

Who owns the extra clothing in your closet?

Reflections

The bread in your cupboard belongs to the hungry; the coat unused in your closet belongs to the one who needs it; the shoes rotting in your closet belong to the one who has no shoes; the money which you hoard up belongs to the poor.” (source)

I’ve been thinking about this quote from St. Basil the Great lately… specifically in the clothing area. I have a surprising amount of clothes that I don’t like or don’t fit properly; why don’t I give them away?

This quote, paired with a minimalist-style desire for less “stuff” in my life, led to the ultimate overhaul of my entire wardrobe.

As I was sorting things, I was having a philosophical discussion with myself (as often happens when I’m home alone; the cat is not much of a conversationalist). Here’s the question:

Why do we give less fortunate people our junk?

The initial answer seems obvious: they don’t have much, so they’ll be grateful for whatever we give them. But what kind of attitude is that? Do I think the invisible “they” don’t know any better and don’t realize they’re getting my junk?

Now, let me add that I come from a very secondhand and thirdhand family… we love Goodwill and thrift stores, and about 90% of my clothing is already secondhand. I’m not a spendy gal. But! We as a community of privileged need to change our attitude.

There were several times I caught myself holding back on donating a dress or pair of shoes… “I paid a lot of money for that! I should hang on to it!” …even though it doesn’t fit and I haven’t worn it in 3 years.

Why should I keep that dress from those who are less fortunate? They are humans just like me and deserve nice things for nice occasions- maybe a wedding or funeral dress? …Does it even matter?

A second excuse I used for keeping clothing was this: “Second-Cousin-Once-Removed-Euphronia-Fitzherbert gave me that top. I should hang on to it.”

The real question I should ask is this: would sweet little Mrs. Fitzherbert be offended if that shirt was given away and worn by someone who needs it multiple times a month (or week!), or would she prefer that it hangs in the closet for another 2 years until I decide that a lime green turtleneck just isn’t going to come back in style?

I had to break the hearts of a few distant relatives today, but they are no worse off for not knowing and I can clear my conscience. It’s something I plan to focus on as I get the rest of the house in order: how can I give from my surplus, instead of just my excess?

 

What are you holding on to that a neighbor needs? Food? A pair of shoes? Spending money? In what areas of your life are you being challenged to surrender your “wants” in order to help the needs of another?

(Author’s note: this post was originally published on one of my other blogs. I’m bringing my best work here, to showcase it and share it a little further).